The Crest of the Neck and Its Importance in Condition Scoring Horses – Kentucky Equine Research



The amount of fat deposited along the neck is heavily influenced by breed. A cresty neck is less commonly seen in thoroughbreds and more likely in cob types and stallions.  

Get hands on and score your horse’s crest from 0-5 by using the images and descriptions below. 

A healthy CNS is 0-2. A score of 3 or higher has been linked to an increased risk of laminitis and Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS)1.  

Fat builds and reduces more slowly in the crest than in other places and once developed is unlikely to fully disappear due to changes in the cell tissue2. Therefore, don’t be disheartened if the crest fat doesn’t reduce like other areas. 

One

The crest can’t be seen but a small amount of fat can be felt. 

Two

The crest can be seen but the fat is spread evenly from the poll to the withers. The crest can be held easily in one hand and is flexible and easy to bend from side to side. 

Three

The crest is thick with a larger amount of fat in the centre of the neck than in the poll or withers. The crest fills one hand and is not so easy to bend from side to side. 

Four

The crest is large and thickened with hard fat and can’t be held with one hand or bent easily from side to side. The crest may have creases along the top. 

Five

The crest is extremely large and droops to one side.

How to fat score your horse

Weighing your horse is a useful monitoring tool but it doesn’t distinguish between muscle and fat. Also, horses are individuals and carry fat in different places.



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FAQs

What is the crest on a horse?

All horses have a crest, the ridge or upper surface of the neck from which the mane erupts. Extending from just behind the poll to the withers, the crest is made of fibro-fatty tissue similar in texture to high-density foam.

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What causes a Cresty neck in horses?

Overweight horses and ponies often develop fatty tissue deposits along their body. When these fat pads develop along the upper curve of their neck, the animal is said to have a cresty neck

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Can a horse lose its crest?

If the horse is hot-blooded like a Thoroughbred, it should lose all of the crest once it has achieved moderate body condition. Stallions of any breed might retain more crest than mares or geldings because deposition of fat in the neck is a secondary sexual characteristic.

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What causes a fallen crest on a horse?

A fallen crest is caused by the Nauchal Ligament in the neck. When the Nauchal Ligament in the neck is Longer than the length of the neck itself, (think of it as an overstretched rubber band loose, inside of a straw), you get a fallen crest.

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How do I get rid of my horses crest?

Addressing underlying metabolic issues, increasing exercise and feeding a lower-calorie diet will support weight loss and help you get rid of your horse’s cresty neck. Once your horse has reached a moderate body condition score of 4-5, excess fat along the neck should be eliminated or significantly reduced.

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What are the parts of a horse called?

Loin: Behind where the saddle sits to where the hip of the horse begins. Muzzle: The part of the head that comes out of a horse’s face including the jaw, mouth and nose. Pastern: The part of a horse between a fetlock and a hoof. Point of Hip: The area below where the loin and croup meet ? the hip of the horse.

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What does Cinnamon do for horses?

Antioxidant-rich Cinnamon is a great digestive aid that can help balance blood sugar levels, making it especially useful for equines prone to weight gain. Use to support healthy digestion, particularly in good doers.

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Does magnesium help laminitis?

Magnesium helps cells respond to insulin. Supplementation with this mineral might improve insulin sensitivity, particularly in overweight horses. It helps prevent laminitis in horses especially in those that are more prone to laminitis in the spring.

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Can a broken crest be fixed?

Unfortunately, a broken crest will remain ?broken? and will never be upright, despite a good EMS management plan. On a positive note, however, such a condition does not cause the animal pain.

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What is broken crest?

A: Your donkey has what is called a fat neck roll or a ?broken crest.? Rather than a result of a damaged nuchal ligament, which is the long band running from the base of the skull to the withers that supports the head and neck, excessive fat deposits along the crest create this condition.

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Why do donkeys get lumpy?

A sarcoid is a type of skin tumour (cancer) found in horses and donkeys. Sarcoids grow as lumps on your donkey’s skin. When they first appear, they may be very small or hidden beneath the hair. This can make them difficult to spot initially, so they may seem to appear suddenly.

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What is wry neck in donkeys?

Wryneck occurs when the neck muscles twist beyond their usual capacity, causing the head to tilt. The condition is also known as torticollis or loxia. Wryneck may develop over time.

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Why do donkeys bite each other?

Dominance. Equines bite within herds to establish dominance between individual animals and to maintain the pecking order. If your donkey has not accepted you as his undisputed leader, he may be inclined to try to bite you to establish his own dominance over you.

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Why do donkeys necks fall over?

Donkeys tend to store all this excess in the form of fatty deposits, or fat pads, all over their bodies. They can develop very large ?cresty? necks, and when the neck gets too fat, it will flop over to one side.

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What is a John donkey?

A John donkey is a castrated jack and is also called a gelding. A donkey can be gelded as early as right after birth or later when he is older. The younger he is gelded the less likely he will develop jack-like tendencies. Geldings have a jack’s intelligence but without the influence of the breeding hormones.

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What is dropped head syndrome?

Dropped head syndrome (DHS) is characterized by severe weakness of the cervical paraspinal muscles that results in the passively correctable chin-on-chest deformity. DHS is most commonly associated with neuromuscular disorders.

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The Crest of the Neck and Its Importance in Condition Scoring …

The Crest of the Neck and Its Importance in Condition Scoring Horses – Kentucky Equine Research Presented by What is the crest of the neck, and why is it important when condition scoring horses? I’ve often heard the phrase “cresty neck” but I am unsure what it means. All horses have a crest, the ridge or upper surface of the neck from which the mane erupts. Extending from just behind the poll to the withers, the crest is made of fibro-fatty tissue similar in texture to high-density foam. Certain horses have larger crests than others, perhaps because of breeding (Warmbloods, draft horses, Iberian-breds, Morgans, and some Welsh ponies) or sex (stallions or late-castrated geldings tend to have more crest than mares). Another factor that influences the size of the crest is body weight. As some horses gain weight, fat settles into the crest. Though body condition scoring systems use neck assessment as part of their overall evaluation, a separate technique, called cresty neck scoring*, specifically gauges the crest fat, which separates regional fat deposition in the crest from general obesity. Regional fat deposition in the neck may indicate an increased risk for disease, including endocrine abnormalities, much like abdominal fat accumulation in humans is closely related to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. With this in mind, importance of neck assessment lies not only in maintenance of moderate body weight (a body condition score of 4, 5, or 6 is acceptable for most horses) but also in staving off metabolic disease. *Cater, R.A., R.J. Geor, W.B. Stanier, T.A. Cubitt, and P.A. Harris. 2009. Apparent adiposity assessed by standardised scoring systems and morphometric measurements in horses and ponies. The Veterinary Journal 179:204-210.

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Equine metabolic syndrome: Size of neck crest an …

Equine metabolic syndrome: Size of neck crest an important sign, research suggests A cresty neck is an enlarged fat deposit along the nuchal ligament, identified by the black bar. This pony was assigned a cresty neck score of 3. Photo: Fitzgerald et al. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0220203.g001 Significant fat deposits on the neck crest are a better predictor of insulin dysregulation in ponies than general obesity, the findings of fresh research suggest. Researchers from Queensland, Australia, reporting in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, have described an experiment involving 26 ponies of mixed breeds, comprising 14 males and 12 females. They wanted to learn more about links between body condition score, cresty neck score and insulin dysregulation. The cresty neck scoring system was first described in the Veterinary Journal in 2009. It is on a scale of 0 to 5 where 0 equals no visual appearance of a crest and 5 equals a crest so large it permanently droops to one side. The Henneke scoring system is commonly used to assess overall body condition in horses. It ranges from 1 to 9, with 1 being poor and 9 being extremely fat. The ideal range for most horses is from 4 to 6. Insulin dysregulation is a metabolic problem that falls among a cluster of derangements found in equine metabolic syndrome. The early identification of insulin dysregulation might enable horse owners to reduce the risk of laminitis, which is identified as a primary weight-related disorder. However, not all cases of horses and ponies with equine metabolic syndrome are overweight. As such, levels of regional fat deposits may prove to be a stronger identifier of equine metabolic syndrome – and therefore the risk of developing laminitis – than generalised obesity. Queensland University of Technology researcher Danielle Fitzgerald and her colleagues noted that no studies had compared obese animals with animals displaying regional fat deposits but an otherwise normal body condition. The ponies used in the study were evaluated by an experienced individual for body condition score and cresty neck score. Half of the ponies were assessed by a second experienced individual to validate the scoring of the first assessor, but these were not used in any other analyses. Of the 26 ponies, 10 were grouped as “normal”, five were “obese”, and 11 were classified as having a high cresty neck score. The body weight, height at the withers, girth circumference and neck circumference were also measured. After assessment, the animals underwent an oral glucose test, with blood samples collected before and two hours after dosing for analysis. Responses to the oral glucose test indicated that both normal and insulin-dysregulated ponies were included in the cohort. Of the entire group, 13 ponies were found to have insulin dysregulation. Of these 13 ponies, two had an ideal body condition, three were obese and eight had a high cresty neck score. “Thus, a cresty neck on an otherwise normal body conditioned pony appears to be a strong predictor of insulin dysregulation,” they reported. “Further, of the 13 ponies without insulin dysregulation eight were in ideal body condition, two were obese and three had a high cresty neck score.” Their analysis found that the ponies with a cresty neck score of three or higher had five times greater odds of being insulin-dysregulated – a finding which they said may be relevant to the diagnosis of equine metabolic syndrome. Those with higher cresty neck scores had a greater insulin response to the oral glucose test than those assessed as being in the normal or fleshy group. Cresty neck score, they concluded, was more predictive of insulin dysregulation than body condition score. “This finding agrees with current thinking that measures of regional adiposity have strong associations with insulin dysregulation, but the role of obesity per se in identifying equine metabolic syndrome is less important.” They…

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Horse Crest – Etsy

Horse Crest – Etsy Common questions Shipping policies vary, but many of our sellers offer free shipping when you purchase from them. Typically, orders of $35 USD or more (within the same shop) qualify for free standard shipping from participating Etsy sellers. Found something you love but want to make it even more uniquely you? Good news! Many sellers on Etsy offer personalized, made-to-order items. To personalize an item: Open the listing page. Choose the options you’d like for the order. This will differ depending on what options are available for the item. Under “Add your personalization,” the text box will tell you what the seller needs to know. Fill out the requested information. Click “Buy it now” or “Add to cart” and proceed to checkout. Don’t see this option? The seller might still be able to personalize your item. Try contacting them via Messages to find out! Absolutely! Our global marketplace is a vibrant community of real people connecting over special goods. With powerful tools and services, along with expert support and education, we help creative entrepreneurs start, manage, and scale their businesses. In 2020 alone, purchases on Etsy generated nearly $4 billion in income for small businesses. We also created 2.6 million jobs in the U.S.—enough to employ the entire city of Houston, TX! From handmade pieces to vintage treasures ready to be loved again, Etsy is the global marketplace for unique and creative goods. It’s also home to a whole host of one-of-a-kind items made with love and extraordinary care. While many of the items on Etsy are handmade, you’ll also find craft supplies, digital items, and more.

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Cresty Neck Score | The British Horse Society

Cresty Neck Score | The British Horse Society The amount of fat deposited along the neck is heavily influenced by breed. A cresty neck is less commonly seen in thoroughbreds and more likely in cob types and stallions.   Get hands on and score your horse’s crest from 0-5 by using the images and descriptions below.  A healthy CNS is 0-2. A score of 3 or higher has been linked to an increased risk of laminitis and Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS)1.   Fat builds and reduces more slowly in the crest than in other places and once developed is unlikely to fully disappear due to changes in the cell tissue2. Therefore, don’t be disheartened if the crest fat doesn’t reduce like other areas.  Zero The crest can’t be seen or felt One The crest can’t be seen but a small amount of fat can be felt.  Two The crest can be seen but the fat is spread evenly from the poll to the withers. The crest can be held easily in one hand and is flexible and easy to bend from side to side.  Three The crest is thick with a larger amount of fat in the centre of the neck than in the poll or withers. The crest fills one hand and is not so easy to bend from side to side.  Four The crest is large and thickened with hard fat and can’t be held with one hand or bent easily from side to side. The crest may have creases along the top.  Five The crest is extremely large and droops to one side. How to fat score your horse Weighing your horse is a useful monitoring tool but it doesn’t distinguish between muscle and fat. Also, horses are individuals and carry fat in different places. Find out more Related articles

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Crest Horse Logo Vector Images (over 730) – VectorStock

Crest Horse Logo Vector Images (over 730) Sign Up Log In New to VectorStock? We’re the largest royalty-free, vector-only stock agency in the world. Every week we add new premium graphics by the thousands. Whether you’re a global ad agency or a freelance graphic designer, we have the vector graphics to make your project come to life. Buy Vectors, sell Vectors or both. Sign up now, it’s free. Email / Username Password Or Login With Google Facebook Similar Premium Searches logos lion crest logo blank crest logo lion crest bill crest crest element crest crown army crest running horse logo horse jumping logo crest leaves vintage crest crest letter crest outline castle crest

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10778 Horse crest Images, Stock Photos & Vectors

10,783 Horse crest Images, Stock Photos & Vectors | ShutterstockImageHorse crest royalty-free images10,783 horse crest stock photos, vectors, and illustrations are available royalty-free. See horse crest stock video clipsSort byPopularClothing and AccessoriesFarm AnimalsheraldrycrestshieldunicorncrownhorsepegasusbrandNextof 108

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How to Get Rid of Cresty Neck in Horses [Feeding & …

How to Get Rid of Cresty Neck in Horses [Feeding & Exercise] | Mad Barn An overabundance of fat along the top of the neckline, otherwise known as cresty neck, is an indicator of metabolic problems in your horse. In fact, researchers believe this type of regional fat deposit (nuchal crest adiposity) is a strong indicator of equine metabolic syndrome (EMS). Recognizing cresty neck in your horse early on is important as EMS can put your horse at risk for developing the potentially debilitating disease, laminitis. If your horse has already developed a cresty neck, the good news is that there are measures you can take to reduce this fat accumulation. Feeding, exercise, and management practices can all help to get rid of a cresty neck. By doing so, you will also reduce your horse’s chance of developing other complications related to metabolic disease. For help with addressing your horse’s cresty neck, submit their information and feeding program for analysis online. What Causes Cresty Neck in Horses? Horses that have cresty neck are usually described as easy keepers or over-conditioned. In addition to being overweight, horses with a cresty neck may have some form of metabolic dysfunction or insulin resistance. When there is too much sugar or starch in the diet (non-structural carbohydrates), they are converted to fat which is stored in fat deposits including the top of the neck. Over time, this area becomes enlarged and hardens. Sugar and starch are found in lush grasses, hay, grains, concentrates, and treats. High NSC feeds can contribute to and exacerbate cresty neck size. Researchers are not exactly sure why horses develop this adiposity along the top of the neck. However, they believe that it may be a repository for long-term fat storage. Horses with cresty neck may also develop fat pockets over the tail head, above the eyes, behind the shoulders, and/or around the sheath in the case of male horses. This fat tissue not only stores energy but also synthesizes and secretes hormones that affect metabolism and insulin function. [1] Prevalence Horses with cresty neck may or may not have general obesity. One study found that obesity status (body condition score) and cresty neck condition were highly associated. In that study, 97.5% of obese horses and 59.6% of non-obese horses had cresty neck. [2] There appears to be a genetic link to EMS and cresty neck, with certain breeds such as Welsh, Dartmoor, and Shetland ponies, as well as Andalusians, Morgans, Mustangs, Arabians, and Warmbloods being more susceptible to insulin resistance. These breeds tend to utilize glucose very efficiently, which ensures they have plenty of energy reserves when food is scarce. This also puts them at risk of greater fat accumulation if their diet supplies excess digestible energy. [9][10] With that said, overfeeding, insufficient exercise, and mineral imbalances can all play a part in the development of cresty neck and it can occur in any breed. Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) Regional adiposity, such as a cresty neck, is thought to be the strongest identifier of EMS. [1] EMS is also linked with obesity and insulin resistance (IR). It prediposes horses to laminitis that is not caused by grain overload, colic, or limb injuries such as fractures. EMS horses may also have elevated triglyceride levels. When horses are insulin resistant, this means that the cells in their muscles, fat, and liver do not respond well to insulin and take less glucose from the blood for energy. To make up for it, the pancreas then makes more insulin. Over time, blood sugar levels increase. Senior horses aged 17-20 have higher blood insulin levels and lower insulin sensitivity than younger horses, which also puts them at risk for EMS. [3] When EMS horses consume a high-NSC diet, their bodies produce higher than normal levels of insulin…

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Cresty Neck Scoring: How to? – HYGAIN

Cresty Neck Scoring: How to? How to score a cresty neck Obesity is associated with insulin resistance in horses and ponies. Overweight horses also have an increased risk of laminitis, and overweight mares have decreased reproductive function. Human studies show that regional fat deposition, such as abdominal fat, is more predictive of metabolic disease than overall body fat. Currently the most common system for assessing a horse’s fatness is using body condition scoring (1-9 scale, Henneke). This method determines overall fatness of horses, but does not differentiate between specific regions of fat. Like abdominal fat in humans, neck crest fat in horses has been suggested to be associated with insulin resistance and increased risk for laminitis. Recent research has developed a novel scoring system for grading neck crest fatness. The “cresty neck scoring system” is on a scale of 0 to 5 where a score of zero equals no visual appearance of a crest and a score of five equals enormous and permanently drooping to one side. Like the current overall body condition scoring system the cresty neck system is subjective and requires experience in learning to judge condition and practice to obtain consistent values. Even with these limitations the cresty neck scoring system has been proven to be a valuable tool when predicting a horse’s risk of metabolic disease. An increase in cresty neck score was associated with an increase in circulating insulin and a decrease in insulin sensitivity in the equines studied. These factors potentially amplify the animals risk for an array of metabolic diseases including laminitis. Points to consider when implementing any condition scoring system are that horse owners should be trained by someone with experience at scoring animals i.e. your local feed company representative or equine nutritionist. Also the same person should be assessing the horse each time to be consistent and account for variation between people. Perhaps taking a monthly photograph of your horse in the same position each time (best in front of a blank wall) would help assess increases or decreases in your horses’ condition. It is crucial to find convenient, easy to use methods for the assessment of regional fatness. While body condition scoring is an accepted method for assessment of overall fatness, neck scoring can standardize the assessment of regional fat distribution on the crest of the neck. This system will provide critical information to horse owners so they can proactively manage their equines to reduce the risk of them contracting these devastating diseases. Source: Carter, 2009  When dealing with horses or ponies with a CNS of 4 or 5 we must be cautious of feeding diets high in sugar and starch as these may make worse any underlying risk for metabolic disease. HYGAIN offers some ideal feed choices for horses that are at risk of contracting metabolic disorders such as Laminitis, Cushings, Chronic Obesity, Insulin Resistance and Tying Up. HYGAIN ZERO® and HYGAIN® ICE® are scientifically formulated high fibre, low starch fortified pellets designed to maintains your horse or pony’s condition while keeping it calm and cool.

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What Equine Metabolic Syndrome looks like – Safergrass.org

What Equine Metabolic Syndrome looks like — Safergrass On horses with EMS, there is often a dip between the withers and the crest. This pony was in lean body condition. This is my ConnemaraX. After I started traveling a lot, I met a woman who had several horses very closely related to her sire. All had chronic laminitis and hyperinsulinemia. When this picture was taken, her insulin levels were 4X normal, even though she was lean and fairly fit from 5X/week exercise at canter on field roads. When genetics drives EMS, diet and exercise may not be enough. When the tip of the coffin bone tips down, a wedge of scar tissue forms at the toe. This should be removed to allow the hoof capsule to realign with the inner bones. Note how the hoof capsule has spaces that are unattached to the inner structures. These are often opened (resected) to dry and prevent final infection from getting established. Working a horse up to a good sweat is best for horses with EMS. The only time this mare had normal insulin levels is when we galloped and cantered 4-6 miles 5X a week. Unfortunately, many people do not have the amount of time to ride that much. Consider finding another person to exercise your horse with EMS.

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