Adoptions — Appalachian Horse Project



Mustang Sally & Sunny

A 21-year-old tattooed mustang in poor condition and heavy in foal was rescued in mid-March, 2020. After running her tattoo number through the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) we learned this old girl came all the way from Nevada! Both AHP and the BLM tried to contact her previous adopter with no success. Her information was sent to the Kentucky State Veterinarian and was posted. No one came forward to claim her, therefore she was placed up for adoption. Mustang Sally now is living a great life on a beautiful farm in Tennessee and has an adorable foal named Sunny.

Sadie adopted 2020

An underweight mare was rescued from a strip job in Breathitt County in early March and is now thriving in her new home. Plenty of hay, feed and pasture turnout.

ellie adopted 2020

Ellie was rescued in early March, 2020, an extremely underweight older black mare. She was adopted in April and is getting all the love, attention and FOOD she can eat! 

Blind Horse Finds New Home

Ray, a beautiful palomino gelding who is blind, was found wandering around near the entrance of an old coal mine haul road that was within a few miles of a major road.  Luckily, we were able to catch and load him without incident. We contacted Rainhill Equine Rescue Facility located in Bowling Green, KY who specializes in blind horse care and were elated that they had room for him!  After two months in foster care while we waited for Rainhill to finish construction on a new paddock, Ray was finally transported to his new home in May 2020. He is now called Shawnee.

Spotted stallion adopted 2020

Due to the fall 2019 drought several horses came off the strip mine lands in search of food.  This beautiful black and white spotted stallion was one of many caught running loose in Magoffin County in January. Once he was handled and broke to lead, he was gelded. He was adopted in February and his new owners are continuing his training and will soon be doing some trail riding!

Lucky – Adopted 2020

In November, 2019, a very emaciated mare and her foal were rescued off a strip job in Breathitt County. Although the mare we named Hope didn’t make it, her colt, now named Lucky, was adopted in early January 2020.

Flash – Adopted 2019

 This cute 5-year-old saddlebred stud pony was surrendered to us in December, 2019 from a wonderful couple that were no longer able to care for him.  He was gelded and soon afterward was adopted. His new owner has been working with him and hopes to be riding him soon. We can’t wait to see this high steppin’ flashy guy in action!

curly – adopted 2019

In June of 2019, we received a call about a small herd of horses that had broken through fences and were causing damage to private property. Working with the county Animal Control Officer, the herd was caught, placed in foster barns and the legal process was followed.  After they were released from the Kentucky State Veterinarian’s stray hold site, they were placed up for adoption. Here are a few of them and their stories. 

One young stallion – we called Curly, was gelded and adopted in mid-July. His new owner re-named him Moonshine and with lots of time and patience, she had him under saddle by December.   

Betty (Now Raven) adopted 2019

A black mare (Betty), who is now known as Raven, was also adopted by the same person – so these two herd mates already had a familiar buddy to begin their new life at their new home in western Kentucky! Betty’s new owner has renamed her Raven.

Dolly – Adopted 2019

The lead mare of the herd we called Dolly is living the good life on a Lexington horse farm and was renamed Quinn.

DOT – Adopted 2019 – THANK YOU TO KY Equine Adoption center

This sweet little two-year-old standardbred filly had what appeared to be a stifle injury.  We transferred her to one of our partner organizations – the Kentucky Equine Adoption Center, who was able to give her the attention and subsequent vet care she needed. We are thankful that it was not as serious as first thought and she made a full recovery and was adopted!

RAVEN – adopted 2019

Raven was found wandering around on a road in Knott County in early February, and was severely underweight.  She was adopted in late February, 2018 by a  couple in Indiana who had been following the Appalachian Horse Project’s Facebook page. Here is a report from them at the end of March:

“Raven is settling in well here in Indiana. She had her 1st vet visit here and is healthy, although she didn’t care for having her temperature taken lol. My vet puts her age around 18. In the next couple of months she will have her teeth floated and a farrier visit. She has picked out her own “room” and will go stand in it when we start getting feed ready. She continues to gain weight. Raven is doing great here and we look foreword to having many years together with her. Thank you again for choosing us to adopt her.”

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Welcome to Heart of Phoenix Equine Rescue – Heart Of …

Welcome to Heart of Phoenix Equine Rescue – Heart Of Phoenix Equine Rescue SAVING THE HORSES OF APPALACHIA FOR OVER A DECADE Impact and Mission Heart of Phoenix is an organization of volunteers, officers and board members across 4 states. We want to save as many neglect horses as possible through rehabbing adoptable horses and finding them the right homes. We offer awesome horses for reasonable fees, an owner safer placement program, gelding and health clinics, humane “end of life” options for owners of horses in need, emergency feed assistance, new equine owner clinics, horsemanship clinics, animal control law enforcement training and more. We are working to help the “Unwanted and Neglected Horse Issue” from the ground up. We invite you to learn more about us, to consider becoming a monthly sponsor/donor, volunteer or foster. Appalachian Trainer Face Off Mulligan Farm Our primary location is in Lesage, West Virginia, just 10 minutes from Huntington, WV. Please click here to see our weekly visitation and volunteer schedule Some of the 900 Lives Saved

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Adoptions – Appalachian Horse Project

Adoptions — Appalachian Horse ProjectMustang Sally & SunnyA 21-year-old tattooed mustang in poor condition and heavy in foal was rescued in mid-March, 2020. After running her tattoo number through the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) we learned this old girl came all the way from Nevada! Both AHP and the BLM tried to contact her previous adopter with no success. Her information was sent to the Kentucky State Veterinarian and was posted. No one came forward to claim her, therefore she was placed up for adoption. Mustang Sally now is living a great life on a beautiful farm in Tennessee and has an adorable foal named Sunny. Sadie adopted 2020An underweight mare was rescued from a strip job in Breathitt County in early March and is now thriving in her new home. Plenty of hay, feed and pasture turnout. ellie adopted 2020 Ellie was rescued in early March, 2020, an extremely underweight older black mare. She was adopted in April and is getting all the love, attention and FOOD she can eat!  Blind Horse Finds New HomeRay, a beautiful palomino gelding who is blind, was found wandering around near the entrance of an old coal mine haul road that was within a few miles of a major road.  Luckily, we were able to catch and load him without incident. We contacted Rainhill Equine Rescue Facility located in Bowling Green, KY who specializes in blind horse care and were elated that they had room for him!  After two months in foster care while we waited for Rainhill to finish construction on a new paddock, Ray was finally transported to his new home in May 2020. He is now called Shawnee.Spotted stallion adopted 2020Due to the fall 2019 drought several horses came off the strip mine lands in search of food.  This beautiful black and white spotted stallion was one of many caught running loose in Magoffin County in January. Once he was handled and broke to lead, he was gelded. He was adopted in February and his new owners are continuing his training and will soon be doing some trail riding!Lucky – Adopted 2020In November, 2019, a very emaciated mare and her foal were rescued off a strip job in Breathitt County. Although the mare we named Hope didn’t make it, her colt, now named Lucky, was adopted in early January 2020. Flash – Adopted 2019  This cute 5-year-old saddlebred stud pony was surrendered to us in December, 2019 from a wonderful couple that were no longer able to care for him.  He was gelded and soon afterward was adopted. His new owner has been working with him and hopes to be riding him soon. We can’t wait to see this high steppin’ flashy guy in action! curly – adopted 2019In June of 2019, we received a call about a small herd of horses that had broken through fences and were causing damage to private property. Working with the county Animal Control Officer, the herd was caught, placed in foster barns and the legal process was followed.  After they were released from the Kentucky State Veterinarian’s stray hold site, they were placed up for adoption. Here are a few of them and their stories.  One young stallion – we called Curly, was gelded and adopted in mid-July. His new owner re-named him Moonshine and with lots of time and patience, she had him under saddle by December.   Betty (Now Raven) adopted 2019A black mare (Betty), who is now known as Raven, was also adopted by the same person – so these two herd mates already had a familiar buddy to begin their new life at their new home in western Kentucky! Betty’s new owner has renamed her Raven. Dolly – Adopted 2019The lead mare of the herd we called Dolly is living the good life on a Lexington horse farm and was renamed Quinn. DOT – Adopted 2019 – THANK YOU TO KY Equine Adoption centerThis sweet little two-year-old standardbred filly had what appeared to be a stifle injury.  We transferred her to one of our partner organizations – the Kentucky Equine Adoption Center, who was able to give her the attention and subsequent vet care she…

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Rescues & Adoptions – Appalachian Horse Project

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Appalachian Horse Help and Rescue – Idealist

Appalachian Horse Help and RescueSearchAbout UsAHHR exists to offer help to horses and horse owners who find themselves in a situation where the basic needs of the animal cannot, or are not being met. We offer shelter for horses and other animals too large to be housed by the SPCA. Our rescue barn is open to the public for group tours.AHHR exists to offer help to horses and horse owners who find themselves in a situation where the basic needs of the animal cannot, or are not being met. We offer shelter for horses and other animals too large to be housed by the SPCA. Our rescue…Issue Areas IncludeAnimalsLocation1201 Yergers Road, Linden, PA 17744, United StatesJoin IdealistSign up today to save your favorite organizations and get email alerts when new ones are posted.

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Appalachian Horse Help and Rescue | Linden, PA 17744

Appalachian Horse Help and Rescue | Linden, PA 17744 Home Add a listing Register Login About Us Home » Pennsylvania Nonprofit List » Linden Nonprofit List Linden, PA – 17744 (570) 322-3260 AHHR exists to offer help to horses and horse owners who find themselves in a situation where the basic needs of the animal cannot or are not being met. We offer shelter for horses and other animals too large to be housed by the SPCA. Our rescue barn is open to the public for group tours. Leave a Reply Name * Mail (will not be published) *

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Appalachian Horse Help & Rescue seeks donations to create …

Appalachian Horse Help & Rescue seeks donations to create pastures MALLORIE McILWAIN/Sun-Gazette This is the donation plaque board showing who has donated to the organization. MALLORIE McILWAIN/Sun-Gazette Reba, a horse at Appalachian Horse Help and Rescue eating some hay. Washington Middle School/High School, Black educators Stephen Cherry, front from left, music teacher, Teresa Booker, dean of students and former special education teacher, Richie Barnes, truancy officer, and Damon Lewis, science teacher, rear, from left, Chet Henderson, principal, Rashaud Olson, language arts teacher and Treg Campbell, English teacher, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2020, in Washington, Pa. According to the state Department of Education, less than 5% of Pennsylvania teachers are people of color, compared with more than 33% of its students – among the widest gaps in the United States. (Karen Mansfield/Observer-Reporter via AP) MALLORIE McILWAIN/Sun-Gazette Pamela Koch, president, giving Misty, the horse, some hay. In this Nov. 2017 photo, researchers gather rock-like structures along the shores of at the Great Salt Lake that are formed by cyanobacteria known as microbialites. Bold water conservation strategies and changes in long-standing law and water policies are needed to slow the alarming shrinking of the Great Salt Lake. A recent report from an by an advisory panel found upstream diversions have long prevented vast quantities from replenishing the lake, reducing the lake by half its normal size with further declines predicted. (Francisco Kjolseth/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP) FILE – This 2016 file photo provided by The Xerces Society shows a rusty patched bumblebee in Minnesota, which was officially designated an endangered species March 21, 2017. Federal regulators said Monday, Aug. 31, 2020, they won’t designate critical habitat for the rusty patched bumblebee, the first bee species in the continental U.S. to be listed as endangered. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said the species can get along without having specially protected habitat, even though its population has dropped 90% in the past two decades. (Sarah Foltz Jordan/The Xerces Society via AP, File) FILE – In this May 5, 2020, file photo, a seasonal worker trains the growing hops by winding or tying two or three shoots clockwise to each string, at Stocks Farm in Suckley, Worcestershire. The coronavirus pandemic has brought hard times for many farmers and has imperiled food security for many millions both in the cities and the countryside. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File) This cover image released by Norton Young Readers shows “Every Night Is Pizza Night” written by cookbook author and restaurateur J. Kenji López-Alt and illustrated by Gianna Ruggiero. (Norton Young Readers via AP) Photo Provided A previous fireworks display in Lock Haven is shown above. MALLORIE McILWAIN/Sun-Gazette The Appalachian Horse Help and Rescue barn located at 1201 Yerger Road in Linden.LINDEN — The Appalachian Horse Help and Rescue located at 1201 Yerger Road, needs some help after the east and west pastures were recently lost due to a lease expiration, according to Pamela Koch, president. The rescue which provides services for all large animals who have been abused, abandoned, neglected or even found during 9-1-1 emergencies, fires or floods, will need to create four smaller pastures on their field behind their barn. The fencing alone will cost between $6,000 and $7,000 but in order to be of service to the animals and create a safe environment, Koch said the land will need grass seed, excavation, run-in shelter sheds for the animals, new piping on the building, a walkway and more. To get all of this completed is an estimated $32,000 and the October fundraising event was canceled due to COVID-19, Koch said. “People usually think of the dogs or the cats. People don’t realize or talk about the large animals,” Koch said. “We need the funds for them.” MALLORIE McILWAIN/Sun-Gazette Reba, a horse at Appalachian Horse Help and Rescue eating some hay.The rescue takes in animals from all of the surrounding counties, providing them with a safe place, plenty of food and water, medicine and vaccinations, places to roam around — essentially nursing them…

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Appalachia | Last Chance Rescue – Horse.TV

Appalachia | Last Chance Rescue – Horse.TV Skip to main content Appalachia | Last Chance Rescue 6 Episodes Heart of Phoenix is a non-profit organization in West Virginia that rescues abused and abandoned horses. After being rescued, the horses are sent to trainers to be tamed and rehabilitated and then eventually auctioned off to new owners at the annual Appalachian Trainer Face-off. 6 Episodes Appalachia | Episode 1 Episode 1 Tinia and the gang head to the mountains to round up a feral herd of horses and get a surprise call from Texas. Appalachia | Episode 2 Episode 2 The horses from Texas get evaluated to see if they’re trainable, and law enforcement gets called in on a new case of animal abuse. Appalachia | Episode 3 Episode 3 Tinia goes to court to fight an abusive horse owner. The crew takes on dangerous terrain for another rescue operation. Erin makes a devastating discovery. Appalachia | Episode 4 Episode 4 The rescued horses get evaluated, vet checked, and assigned to their trainers in preparation for the Appalachian Trainer Face-off where they’ll be auctioned off to a new owner. Appalachia | Episode 5 Episode 5 With horses & trainers paired up, it’s time to start preparing for the Appalachian Trainer Face-off. Appalachia | Episode 6 Episode 6 It’s time to see if all the hard work paid off as the trainers all meet up to compete at the Appalachian Trainer Face-off.

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